Discussion:
'tie'- or 'slur'-like character
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Peter Percival
2018-05-12 15:15:43 UTC
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I'm looking for a symbol to denote concatenation of strings. It will
look a bit like a frown in superscript position. Any suggestions?
--
Principle of tolerance: it is not our business to set up prohibitions,
but to arrive at conventions. [...] In logic there are no morals.
Everyone is at liberty to build up his own logic, i.e. his own form of
language, as he wishes. -- Rudolph Carnap, /Logical syntax of language/.
Peter Flynn
2018-05-13 22:28:53 UTC
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I'm looking for a symbol to denote concatenation of strings.  It will
look a bit like a frown in superscript position.  Any suggestions?
Is the standard tie-after accent usable for this?

///Peter
Peter Percival
2018-05-14 11:42:37 UTC
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Post by Peter Flynn
I'm looking for a symbol to denote concatenation of strings.  It will
look a bit like a frown in superscript position.  Any suggestions?
Is the standard tie-after accent usable for this?
///Peter
It may be. What is it and where will I find it? Excuse my ignorance!
--
Principle of tolerance: it is not our business to set up prohibitions,
but to arrive at conventions. [...] In logic there are no morals.
Everyone is at liberty to build up his own logic, i.e. his own form of
language, as he wishes. -- Rudolph Carnap, /Logical syntax of language/.
Peter Flynn
2018-05-14 22:13:51 UTC
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Post by Peter Percival
I'm looking for a symbol to denote concatenation of strings. It
will look a bit like a frown in superscript position. Any
suggestions?
Is the standard tie-after accent usable for this? >
It may be. What is it and where will I find it? Excuse my ignorance!
\t ab will put it across a and b

See any LaTeX documentation under "Accents", eg
http://latex.silmaril.ie/formattinginformation/accents.html#accentcodes

///Peter
b***@free.fr
2018-05-13 22:44:59 UTC
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Post by Peter Percival
I'm looking for a symbol to denote concatenation of strings. It will
look a bit like a frown in superscript position. Any suggestions?
--
Principle of tolerance: it is not our business to set up prohibitions,
but to arrive at conventions. [...] In logic there are no morals.
Everyone is at liberty to build up his own logic, i.e. his own form of
language, as he wishes. -- Rudolph Carnap, /Logical syntax of language/.
If I understand well, the \wideparen command from package yhmath should do what you want.

Bernard
Peter Percival
2018-05-14 17:38:54 UTC
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I'm looking for a symbol to denote concatenation of strings.  It will
look a bit like a frown in superscript position.  Any suggestions?
Maybe this makes sense: I'd like to write A^B with the ^ appearing
literally rather than raising the B.

It would be nice if in a^b it was at that height, while in A^B it was a
smidgen higher. Or not, because what of a^B and A^b?!
--
Principle of tolerance: it is not our business to set up prohibitions,
but to arrive at conventions. [...] In logic there are no morals.
Everyone is at liberty to build up his own logic, i.e. his own form of
language, as he wishes. -- Rudolph Carnap, /Logical syntax of language/.
Peter Percival
2018-05-14 17:57:44 UTC
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Post by Peter Percival
I'm looking for a symbol to denote concatenation of strings.  It will
look a bit like a frown in superscript position.  Any suggestions?
Maybe this makes sense: I'd like to write A^B with the ^ appearing
literally rather than raising the B.
It would be nice if in a^b it was at that height, while in A^B it was a
smidgen higher.  Or not, because what of a^B and A^b?!
I'll settle for $A\symbol{'136}\!B$ and $a\symbol{'136}b$, with the \!
optional, if nothing better turns up.
--
Principle of tolerance: it is not our business to set up prohibitions,
but to arrive at conventions. [...] In logic there are no morals.
Everyone is at liberty to build up his own logic, i.e. his own form of
language, as he wishes. -- Rudolph Carnap, /Logical syntax of language/.
Peter Flynn
2018-05-14 22:18:23 UTC
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Post by Peter Percival
I'm looking for a symbol to denote concatenation of strings.  It will
look a bit like a frown in superscript position.  Any suggestions?
Maybe this makes sense: I'd like to write A^B with the ^ appearing
literally rather than raising the B.
Do you want the symbol to bridge a gap *between* A and B, or to appear
*over* AB with no horizontal space?
Post by Peter Percival
It would be nice if in a^b it was at that height, while in A^B it was a
smidgen higher.
That's what using an accent will do.
Post by Peter Percival
  Or not, because what of a^B and A^b?!
It will always be positioned over the higher of the two.

You didn't mention that you wanted this in math mode. The tie-after
accent is for text mode. In math mode, use $\widehat{AB}$

///Peter
Peter Percival
2018-05-15 10:11:42 UTC
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Post by Peter Flynn
Post by Peter Percival
I'm looking for a symbol to denote concatenation of strings.  It will
look a bit like a frown in superscript position.  Any suggestions?
Maybe this makes sense: I'd like to write A^B with the ^ appearing
literally rather than raising the B.
Do you want the symbol to bridge a gap *between* A and B, or to appear
*over* AB with no horizontal space?
Bridging a gap.
Post by Peter Flynn
Post by Peter Percival
It would be nice if in a^b it was at that height, while in A^B it was
a smidgen higher.
That's what using an accent will do.
Post by Peter Percival
  Or not, because what of a^B and A^b?!
It will always be positioned over the higher of the two.
You didn't mention that you wanted this in math mode.
No, I didn't did I? Sorry.
Post by Peter Flynn
The tie-after
accent is for text mode. In math mode, use $\widehat{AB}$
Thank you.
Post by Peter Flynn
///Peter
--
Principle of tolerance: it is not our business to set up prohibitions,
but to arrive at conventions. [...] In logic there are no morals.
Everyone is at liberty to build up his own logic, i.e. his own form of
language, as he wishes. -- Rudolph Carnap, /Logical syntax of language/.
Peter Flynn
2018-05-16 23:15:08 UTC
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Post by Peter Percival
Post by Peter Flynn
Post by Peter Percival
I'm looking for a symbol to denote concatenation of strings.  It
will look a bit like a frown in superscript position.  Any suggestions?
Maybe this makes sense: I'd like to write A^B with the ^ appearing
literally rather than raising the B.
Do you want the symbol to bridge a gap *between* A and B, or to appear
*over* AB with no horizontal space?
Bridging a gap.
Maybe try $\widehat{A\thinspace B}$

///Peter
Peter Percival
2018-05-25 11:23:06 UTC
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Post by Peter Flynn
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Peter Flynn
Post by Peter Percival
I'm looking for a symbol to denote concatenation of strings.  It
will look a bit like a frown in superscript position.  Any suggestions?
Maybe this makes sense: I'd like to write A^B with the ^ appearing
literally rather than raising the B.
Do you want the symbol to bridge a gap *between* A and B, or to
appear *over* AB with no horizontal space?
Bridging a gap.
Maybe try $\widehat{A\thinspace B}$
///Peter
Thank you.
--
Principle of tolerance: it is not our business to set up prohibitions,
but to arrive at conventions. [...] In logic there are no morals.
Everyone is at liberty to build up his own logic, i.e. his own form of
language, as he wishes. -- Rudolph Carnap, /Logical syntax of language/.
Peter Percival
2018-11-07 17:52:39 UTC
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I'm looking for a symbol to denote concatenation of strings.  It will
look a bit like a frown in superscript position.  Any suggestions?
I forgot that four-ish years ago I used ^\frown, e.g.,
$\Phi^\frown\Psi$, and it looks fine. I'm a twit (don't all shout 'yes
we know!' at once) and I would like to unask my question.
--
"He who will not reason is a bigot;
he who cannot is a fool;
he who dares not is a slave."
- Sir William Drummond
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