Discussion:
How to force a "made up" symbol to space like a binary relation?
(too old to reply)
Peter Percival
2018-09-09 18:14:33 UTC
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I'm using $\frac{\smile}{\frown}$ as an approximation to a symbol that
stands for a relation between two functions. So I would like
$f\frac{\smile}{\frown}\phi$ to be spaced like $f\approx\phi$, say. How
may I do that?

Should it be of interest to anyone, the symbol I'm approximating is on
page two of G.H. Hardy's /Orders of infinity/. If anyone knows of that
symbol precisely so that I don't have to roll my own, please tell!
Jean-Côme Charpentier
2018-09-09 18:40:36 UTC
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Post by Peter Percival
I'm using $\frac{\smile}{\frown}$ as an approximation to a symbol that
stands for a relation between two functions.  So I would like
$f\frac{\smile}{\frown}\phi$ to be spaced like $f\approx\phi$, say.  How
may I do that?
Use \mathrel{...}.
Post by Peter Percival
Should it be of interest to anyone, the symbol I'm approximating is on
page two of G.H. Hardy's /Orders of infinity/.  If anyone knows of that
symbol precisely so that I don't have to roll my own, please tell!
At least MnSymbol provides this symbol:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{MnSymbol} % for \smileeqfrown
\begin{document}

$f \frac{\smile}{\frown} g$

$f \mathrel{\frac{\smile}{\frown}} g$

$f \smileeqfrown g$

\end{document}

Jean-Côme Charpentier
Peter Percival
2018-09-09 19:50:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Percival
I'm using $\frac{\smile}{\frown}$ as an approximation to a symbol that
stands for a relation between two functions.  So I would like
$f\frac{\smile}{\frown}\phi$ to be spaced like $f\approx\phi$, say.
How may I do that?
  Use \mathrel{...}.
Post by Peter Percival
Should it be of interest to anyone, the symbol I'm approximating is on
page two of G.H. Hardy's /Orders of infinity/.  If anyone knows of
that symbol precisely so that I don't have to roll my own, please tell!
\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{MnSymbol} % for \smileeqfrown
\begin{document}
$f \frac{\smile}{\frown} g$
$f \mathrel{\frac{\smile}{\frown}} g$
$f \smileeqfrown g$
\end{document}
  Jean-Côme Charpentier
Thank you.
Peter Percival
2018-09-10 13:49:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Peter Percival
I'm using $\frac{\smile}{\frown}$ as an approximation to a symbol
that stands for a relation between two functions.  So I would like
$f\frac{\smile}{\frown}\phi$ to be spaced like $f\approx\phi$, say.
How may I do that?
   Use \mathrel{...}.
Post by Peter Percival
Should it be of interest to anyone, the symbol I'm approximating is
on page two of G.H. Hardy's /Orders of infinity/.  If anyone knows of
that symbol precisely so that I don't have to roll my own, please tell!
\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{MnSymbol} % for \smileeqfrown
\begin{document}
$f \frac{\smile}{\frown} g$
$f \mathrel{\frac{\smile}{\frown}} g$
$f \smileeqfrown g$
\end{document}
   Jean-Côme Charpentier
Thank you.
\usepackage{MnSymbol} emboldens $/$ and $\infty$.
Jean-Côme Charpentier
2018-09-10 18:31:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Jean-Côme Charpentier
[...]
\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{MnSymbol} % for \smileeqfrown
\begin{document}
$f \smileeqfrown g$
\end{document}
   Jean-Côme Charpentier
Thank you.
\usepackage{MnSymbol} emboldens $/$ and $\infty$.
I'm not sure to understand 'emboldens' in your sentence (my french
limitation). You mean bolder than "usual"? That's right, although I
could say thay "usual" fonts (translate as Computer Modern) are thiner
than "normal" :-)
Anyway, it's sure that MnSymbol don't fit very well with Computer
Modern (or Latin Modern). This font was originally designed as companion
to Adobe Minion Pro (see MnSymbol's documentation).

You can obtain only one symbol of a mathematic font without loading
the whole font but it's quite tricky:

\documentclass{article}
\DeclareFontFamily{U}{MnSymbolD}{}
\DeclareFontShape{U}{MnSymbolD}{m}{n}{
<-6> MnSymbolD5
<6-7> MnSymbolD6
<7-8> MnSymbolD7
<8-9> MnSymbolD8
<9-10> MnSymbolD9
<10-12> MnSymbolD10
<12-> MnSymbolD12}{}
\DeclareSymbolFont{MnSyD}{U}{MnSymbolD}{m}{n}
\DeclareMathSymbol{\smileeqfrown}{\mathrel}{MnSyD}{"26}

\begin{document}
$f \smileeqfrown g$

3/4 $3/4$

$\infty$
\end{document}

Jean-Côme Charpentier
Peter Percival
2018-09-10 19:35:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Jean-Côme Charpentier
[...]
\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{MnSymbol} % for \smileeqfrown
\begin{document}
$f \smileeqfrown g$
\end{document}
   Jean-Côme Charpentier
Thank you.
\usepackage{MnSymbol} emboldens $/$ and $\infty$.
  I'm not sure to understand 'emboldens' in your sentence (my french
limitation). You mean bolder than "usual"?
Yes, that's what I meant
That's right, although I
could say thay "usual" fonts (translate as Computer Modern) are thiner
than "normal" :-)
  Anyway, it's sure that MnSymbol don't fit very well with Computer
Modern (or Latin Modern). This font was originally designed as companion
to Adobe Minion Pro (see MnSymbol's documentation).
  You can obtain only one symbol of a mathematic font without loading
\documentclass{article}
\DeclareFontFamily{U}{MnSymbolD}{}
\DeclareFontShape{U}{MnSymbolD}{m}{n}{
    <-6>  MnSymbolD5
   <6-7>  MnSymbolD6
   <7-8>  MnSymbolD7
   <8-9>  MnSymbolD8
   <9-10> MnSymbolD9
  <10-12> MnSymbolD10
  <12->   MnSymbolD12}{}
\DeclareSymbolFont{MnSyD}{U}{MnSymbolD}{m}{n}
\DeclareMathSymbol{\smileeqfrown}{\mathrel}{MnSyD}{"26}
\begin{document}
$f \smileeqfrown g$
3/4 $3/4$
$\infty$
\end{document}
  Jean-Côme Charpentier
Thank you. I'm only writing notes for my own use, so playing with a few
tricks is maybe fun!
b***@free.fr
2018-09-10 19:57:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Jean-Côme Charpentier
[...]
\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{MnSymbol} % for \smileeqfrown
\begin{document}
$f \smileeqfrown g$
\end{document}
   Jean-Côme Charpentier
Thank you.
\usepackage{MnSymbol} emboldens $/$ and $\infty$.
  I'm not sure to understand 'emboldens' in your sentence (my french
limitation). You mean bolder than "usual"?
Yes, that's what I meant
That's right, although I
could say thay "usual" fonts (translate as Computer Modern) are thiner
than "normal" :-)
  Anyway, it's sure that MnSymbol don't fit very well with Computer
Modern (or Latin Modern). This font was originally designed as companion
to Adobe Minion Pro (see MnSymbol's documentation).
  You can obtain only one symbol of a mathematic font without loading
\documentclass{article}
\DeclareFontFamily{U}{MnSymbolD}{}
\DeclareFontShape{U}{MnSymbolD}{m}{n}{
    <-6>  MnSymbolD5
   <6-7>  MnSymbolD6
   <7-8>  MnSymbolD7
   <8-9>  MnSymbolD8
   <9-10> MnSymbolD9
  <10-12> MnSymbolD10
  <12->   MnSymbolD12}{}
\DeclareSymbolFont{MnSyD}{U}{MnSymbolD}{m}{n}
\DeclareMathSymbol{\smileeqfrown}{\mathrel}{MnSyD}{"26}
\begin{document}
$f \smileeqfrown g$
3/4 $3/4$
$\infty$
\end{document}
  Jean-Côme Charpentier
Thank you. I'm only writing notes for my own use, so playing with a few
tricks is maybe fun!
Another possibility, which looks closer to the standard fonts, would be to borrow the symbol – and its negated version– to mathabx, which knows them as \asymp and \notasymp. The following code defines them wothout loading all the mathabx fonts:


\DeclareFontFamily{U}{matha}{\hyphenchar\font45}
\DeclareFontShape{U}{matha}{m}{n}{ <-6> matha5 <6-7> matha6 <7-8>
matha7 <8-9> matha8 <9-10> matha9 <10-12> matha10 <12-> matha12 }{}
\DeclareSymbolFont{matha}{U}{matha}{m}{n}

\DeclareMathSymbol{\asymp}{\mathrel}{matha}{"16}
\DeclareMathSymbol{\notasymp}{\mathrel}{matha}{"1E}

Bernard

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