Discussion:
How do you "skip lines" in LaTex
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Ray
2010-12-10 15:13:03 UTC
Permalink
Hello,

How do you "skip lines" in LaTex. Specifically, I would like to
include a blank line between a centered title (using \begin{center}...
\end{center}) and the first line of text. When I tried to do this
using the "\\" as a line skip, LaTex gave me an error indicating that
"there's no line here to end." What am I doing wrong?

Thank you,
Ray Levitt
Lars Madsen
2010-12-10 15:17:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ray
Hello,
How do you "skip lines" in LaTex. Specifically, I would like to
include a blank line between a centered title (using \begin{center}...
\end{center}) and the first line of text. When I tried to do this
using the "\\" as a line skip, LaTex gave me an error indicating that
"there's no line here to end." What am I doing wrong?
Thank you,
Ray Levitt
in general \\ should NEVER be used in normal text (in most cases users
do not need to do manual line breaks in normal text)

\end{center} already adds blank space after its contents, do you need more?
--
/daleif (remove RTFSIGNATURE from email address)

LaTeX FAQ: http://www.tex.ac.uk/faq
LaTeX book: http://www.imf.au.dk/system/latex/bog/ (in Danish)
Remember to post minimal examples, see URL below
http://www.tex.ac.uk/cgi-bin/texfaq2html?label=minxampl
http://www.minimalbeispiel.de/mini-en.html
Dan Luecking
2010-12-10 21:55:27 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 10 Dec 2010 16:17:56 +0100, Lars Madsen
Post by Lars Madsen
Post by Ray
Hello,
How do you "skip lines" in LaTex. Specifically, I would like to
include a blank line between a centered title (using \begin{center}...
\end{center}) and the first line of text. When I tried to do this
using the "\\" as a line skip, LaTex gave me an error indicating that
"there's no line here to end." What am I doing wrong?
Thank you,
Ray Levitt
in general \\ should NEVER be used in normal text (in most cases users
do not need to do manual line breaks in normal text)
He is talking about a "centered title", which almost
always *requires* a user to use \\ for best appearance.

Of course, \\ is for breaking lines, not adding space.
Between paragraphs it doesn't work. At the end of a
paragraph it works, but creates an "underfull hbox"
warning.


Dan
To reply by email, change LookInSig to luecking
Olive
2010-12-10 15:43:26 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 10 Dec 2010 07:13:03 -0800 (PST)
Post by Ray
Hello,
How do you "skip lines" in LaTex. Specifically, I would like to
include a blank line between a centered title (using \begin{center}...
\end{center}) and the first line of text. When I tried to do this
using the "\\" as a line skip, LaTex gave me an error indicating that
"there's no line here to end." What am I doing wrong?
Thank you,
Ray Levitt
To achieve your purpose, I have defined:

\def\wl{\par \vspace{\baselineskip}}

Then you just use \wl to have a blank line.

Olive
s***@gmail.com
2013-05-17 22:26:39 UTC
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Thanks Olive! I found your reply to be the most helpful!
a***@gmail.com
2020-06-10 06:40:20 UTC
Permalink
Thank you very much!

Zeissmann
2010-12-10 17:46:06 UTC
Permalink
How do you "skip lines" in LaTex. Specifically, I would like to include
a blank line between a centered title (using \begin{center}...
\end{center}) and the first line of text. When I tried to do this using
the "\\" as a line skip, LaTex gave me an error indicating that "there's
no line here to end." What am I doing wrong?
LaTeX (and TeX for that matter) doesn't let you insert ,,blank lines''.
That's because it's a bad practice to separate the body of the text by
blanks. It's simply not the philosophy of TeX to do that and it's an
indicator of an MS Word user. To insert some space in between a title and
the underneath text you can do one of the following:

1. Insert a \smallskip, \medskip or \bigskip which basically are equal to
some default amount of glue, which is capable of streatch -- they differ
in the amount of glue.
2. Leave a blank line in the source (*.tex) file, which TeX should
interpret as some glue -- this is AFAIK the same as \medskip.
3. The most hideous way is to place a \vspace{} which lets you place
exactly the amount of glue you want -- but I wouldn't do that if I were
you.

There may be more methods, but they are less standard.
zappathustra
2010-12-10 18:00:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Zeissmann
How do you "skip lines" in LaTex. Specifically, I would like to include
a blank line between a centered title (using \begin{center}...
\end{center}) and the first line of text. When I tried to do this using
the "\\" as a line skip, LaTex gave me an error indicating that "there's
no line here to end." What am I doing wrong?
LaTeX (and TeX for that matter) doesn't let you insert ,,blank lines''.
That's because it's a bad practice to separate the body of the text by
blanks.
Where does that come from?
Post by Zeissmann
It's simply not the philosophy of TeX to do that and it's an
indicator of an MS Word user.
White space in the middle of a text? I didn't know MS Word was as old as
typography.
Post by Zeissmann
To insert some space in between a title and
1. Insert a \smallskip, \medskip or \bigskip which basically are equal to
some default amount of glue, which is capable of streatch -- they differ
in the amount of glue.
2. Leave a blank line in the source (*.tex) file, which TeX should
interpret as some glue -- this is AFAIK the same as \medskip.
A blank line in the source is a paragraph, hence \parskip is inserted.
Which is not sure to produce any space, and if it does, the amount can
change from page to page.
Post by Zeissmann
3. The most hideous way is to place a \vspace{} which lets you place
exactly the amount of glue you want -- but I wouldn't do that if I were
you.
There may be more methods, but they are less standard.
The \vspace method, i.e. \vskip method in TeX, is basically the best
one, if the user is asking for a blank line, which is an amount of glue
taking as much space as a line. Which is still one of the most used
methods (not only by MS Word users) to separate paragraphs if needed,
and the best (as far as I'm concerned), since it avoids unpredictable
space between paragraphs.

Of course, the \vskip\baselineskip is best wrapped in a macro, because
that makes life simpler.

Paul
Zeissmann
2010-12-10 19:18:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by zappathustra
Post by Zeissmann
LaTeX (and TeX for that matter) doesn't let you insert ,,blank lines''.
That's because it's a bad practice to separate the body of the text by
blanks.
Where does that come from?
From good practice I suppose? Placing empty lines isn't the right way to
have a vertical white space in a text. Lines are for writing not for
separating. That's why TeX doesn't give you an easy way to insert blank
lines in text. Of course you can do almost anything in TeX -- therefore
this as well -- but that doesn't make it the right thing to do.
Post by zappathustra
White space in the middle of a text? I didn't know MS Word was as old as
typography.
It's not. That's why it lets you use a BLANK LINE as a white space. For
inserting WHITE SPACE TeX has different tools.
Post by zappathustra
Post by Zeissmann
2. Leave a blank line in the source (*.tex) file, which TeX should
interpret as some glue -- this is AFAIK the same as \medskip.
A blank line in the source is a paragraph, hence \parskip is inserted.
Which is not sure to produce any space, and if it does, the amount can
change from page to page.
I admit, I got a little confused on this one.
Post by zappathustra
The \vspace method, i.e. \vskip method in TeX, is basically the best
one, if the user is asking for a blank line, which is an amount of glue
taking as much space as a line. Which is still one of the most used
methods (not only by MS Word users) to separate paragraphs if needed,
and the best (as far as I'm concerned), since it avoids unpredictable
space between paragraphs.
OK, so maybe \vspace isn't the most hideous way, but still it's not the
tool for a standard white space because it takes any amount of glue you
feed it with. It's intended for non-standard spaces, like a reservation
for something to be added later in it's place. Of course Ray may want a
strange effect, like text starting halfway through the page...
Post by zappathustra
Of course, the \vskip\baselineskip is best wrapped in a macro, because
that makes life simpler.
I agree, macros are useful...

Zeissmann
zappathustra
2010-12-10 22:47:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Zeissmann
Post by zappathustra
Post by Zeissmann
LaTeX (and TeX for that matter) doesn't let you insert ,,blank lines''.
That's because it's a bad practice to separate the body of the text by
blanks.
Where does that come from?
From good practice I suppose? Placing empty lines isn't the right way to
have a vertical white space in a text. Lines are for writing not for
separating. That's why TeX doesn't give you an easy way to insert blank
lines in text. Of course you can do almost anything in TeX -- therefore
this as well -- but that doesn't make it the right thing to do.
Post by zappathustra
White space in the middle of a text? I didn't know MS Word was as old as
typography.
It's not. That's why it lets you use a BLANK LINE as a white space. For
inserting WHITE SPACE TeX has different tools.
Ok, let's say we got confused over white space/blank line. For me blank
line is an accurate description of a white space when it is supposed to
take the space of a line.
Post by Zeissmann
Post by zappathustra
Post by Zeissmann
2. Leave a blank line in the source (*.tex) file, which TeX should
interpret as some glue -- this is AFAIK the same as \medskip.
A blank line in the source is a paragraph, hence \parskip is inserted.
Which is not sure to produce any space, and if it does, the amount can
change from page to page.
I admit, I got a little confused on this one.
Post by zappathustra
The \vspace method, i.e. \vskip method in TeX, is basically the best
one, if the user is asking for a blank line, which is an amount of glue
taking as much space as a line. Which is still one of the most used
methods (not only by MS Word users) to separate paragraphs if needed,
and the best (as far as I'm concerned), since it avoids unpredictable
space between paragraphs.
OK, so maybe \vspace isn't the most hideous way, but still it's not the
tool for a standard white space because it takes any amount of glue you
feed it with. It's intended for non-standard spaces, like a reservation
for something to be added later in it's place. Of course Ray may want a
strange effect, like text starting halfway through the page...
No, \vspace is used to add vertical space. The \bigskip, etc., you
mentionned, are nothing but \vspace's with fixed values (if \vspace is
just a wrapper for \vskip, that is, which I think it is). And you don't
need non-standard space to use it. There are three ways to add vertical
space: an empty box, a kern, or a vskip. An empty box doesn't make
sense, a kern makes sense in some situations, and a vskip is used
anywhere else. Again, \bigskip and others are just \vskip with
predefined lengths.


Paul
Zeissmann
2010-12-11 00:56:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by zappathustra
No, \vspace is used to add vertical space. The \bigskip, etc., you
mentionned, are nothing but \vspace's with fixed values (if \vspace is
just a wrapper for \vskip, that is, which I think it is). And you don't
need non-standard space to use it. There are three ways to add vertical
space: an empty box, a kern, or a vskip. An empty box doesn't make
sense, a kern makes sense in some situations, and a vskip is used
anywhere else. Again, \bigskip and others are just \vskip with
predefined lengths.
That's true, \bigskip et al. are the same as \vskip to Xpt, etc. What I
mean to say is they were defined to use them for white spaces in the
first place. Their intended for the job. So of course you can put a \vskip
or \vspace. Still I consider putting a blank LINE something
unprofessional -- and that's precisely why the command "\\" doesn't work
on its own. Come to think of it, it's really more the question of
understanding what you're doing.

And an empty box does make sense. In fact \strut is an empty box.

Yours,
Zeissmann
Dan Luecking
2010-12-10 21:50:55 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 10 Dec 2010 17:46:06 +0000 (UTC), Zeissmann
Post by Zeissmann
How do you "skip lines" in LaTex. Specifically, I would like to include
a blank line between a centered title (using \begin{center}...
\end{center}) and the first line of text. When I tried to do this using
the "\\" as a line skip, LaTex gave me an error indicating that "there's
no line here to end." What am I doing wrong?
LaTeX (and TeX for that matter) doesn't let you insert ,,blank lines''.
That's because it's a bad practice to separate the body of the text by
blanks. It's simply not the philosophy of TeX to do that and it's an
indicator of an MS Word user. To insert some space in between a title and
1. Insert a \smallskip, \medskip or \bigskip which basically are equal to
some default amount of glue, which is capable of streatch -- they differ
in the amount of glue.
Most article and chapter titles are separated from the
text by considerably more than \bigskip. I hold in my
hand a math text from Springer-Verlag that puts 1cm
space below each chapter title. And now another that
puts 2cm below chapter titles (and 1cm below even
section titles).
Post by Zeissmann
2. Leave a blank line in the source (*.tex) file, which TeX should
interpret as some glue -- this is AFAIK the same as \medskip.
It adds \parskip of space, which is 0pt plus 1pt by
default. Much less than \medskip.
Post by Zeissmann
3. The most hideous way is to place a \vspace{} which lets you place
exactly the amount of glue you want -- but I wouldn't do that if I were
you.
This is actually THE way (the only way) to put space
after a title. Most LaTeX document classes have a
\maketitle command which, as expected, contains the
relevant \vspace as part of its definition.

Dan
To reply by email, change LookInSig to luecking
Peter Flynn
2010-12-26 15:19:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ray
Hello,
How do you "skip lines" in LaTex.
You specify them as part of a macro.
Post by Ray
Specifically, I would like to
include a blank line between a centered title (using \begin{center}...
\end{center}) and the first line of text.
A title for what? A section or subsection? Table? Figure? All of these
have their own special names, and packages to let you adjust the spacing
underneath them. Don't try to do it by hand...use a package.
Post by Ray
When I tried to do this
using the "\\" as a line skip, LaTex gave me an error indicating that
"there's no line here to end." What am I doing wrong?
Using \\. This is for prematurely ending a line in mid-paragraph, not
for inserting vertical white-space between paragraphs.

Tell us what kind of title it is, as there is probably a prewritten answer.

///Peter
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